Monthly Archives: June 2015

Teaching the LMS through a Game (Part 2)

I looked at obstacles I have faced in my current training. Faculty were resistant to looking at new features, saying that would not work in my discipline or what I have works well enough. I also had faculty continue to struggle with finding support resources. It also felt from a support role faculty were getting the how to steps of the LMS, but not the why they should do something. Also from the feedback I got from students many faculty were missing key best practices and pedagogical principles of the online tools they were working with.

So I dug into game theory and found some tips that I found very helpful. The first was the idea of a role. If I could get the faculty to step outside the role of instructor and have them look at the course design process as an instructional designer they might just see the course and learning objectives in a new way. They would not be limited by their current set of LMS tools. I also though the idea of designing for someone else would help them get past those barriers. Other things I know I needed to address was the idea of levels of experience the ability to allow for mastery, an element of chance or randomness, a level of interactivity, the ability to earn rewards and to provide realistic feedback that is instructional. I know if people fail, they want to know why.

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A School Day That’s All About Play

Imagine a school where the students’ day revolves around playing games, all day long. Video games, live action role-playing games, board games, building games. At the PlayMaker School in Los Angeles, the school day takes kids from one game activity to the next, as they explore any number of different subjects and ideas, from the physics of flight to ancient Mesopotamian culture. PBS NewsHour’s April Brown gives us a glimpse into this otherworldly school.

Read it here

Teaching the LMS through a Game (Part 1)

As I look back at the Learning Management System (LMS) Training I have done for the last several years I find many flaws. The LMS has gotten so complex it is impossible to cover all the tools and features that a faculty may or may not use. It is hard enough to get faculty to sit through training and if you are throwing things at them they don’t think they want or need you lose them. The result I have found are faculty that continue to use only the features they are comfortable with and only change as students demand it or the changes in the LMS require it.

What I needed was a way to get faculty out of the mindset of updating their skills for their course needs and think more broadly about what the LMS has to offer and then to select the tools and features to meet their pedagogical needs. You know make them an active participant in their learning. I wanted to encourage them to explore resources and develop ideas to address the learning objectives of the courses their were teaching. To address this I decided on a game, but how to turn the LMS Training into a game?

How to fix a broken school? Lead fearlessly, love hard

SLATE Conference – Call for Papers and Registration Information

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The 13th Annual SLATE Conference the Midwest’s premier educational technology and teaching event, has attracted faculty and IT learning professionals from across the country and around the world in higher-ed, K-12, government, and business.

The conference will be held on October 21-23, 2015 and hosted by Northern Illinois University at their regional campus in Naperville, IL (thirty minutes from downtown Chicago).

The Call for Papers and the Early-bird Registration discount will both be ending at the end of June.