Category Archives: Gamification

An Introduction to the STEAM Carnival by Two Bit Circus

Advertisements

Lasers, Fire, Robots: The Best of STEAM Carnival 2014

A Jedi Story: Gamification at Work

Key Takeaways

  • Moving faculty and staff to Gmail and Google Calendar required quickly training IT professionals across campus to support the new systems — which were not a priority among their other pressing concerns.
  • Introducing gaming elements to the Google apps training via the Jedi Academy excited staff and faculty and attracted more participants than expected.
  • As shown by the Jedi Academy’s success, appropriate use of gaming elements can make otherwise mundane or avoided tasks, including support training, fun and rewarding.

Read it all here

Teaching the LMS through a Game (Part 4)

What worked. The instructors seamed to like the challenges and did attempt them several times. The team members worked very well together to build great courses. All instructors reported they learned new things about the LMS.

And what didn’t. My immediate feedback from the group was the instructions to get started were not clear enough. And as a result they felt they were behind to start with. It was clear after the first week that team member abilities with the LMS and course design were no where close to even. As a result of that the idea of team totals based on the challenges would be unfair and eliminated.

And what worked with modification. Changes were requested early on in the way challenges were run. Originally challenges were available up until the time the team members meet face to face. Everyone asked that they remain open so they could continue to take them. Also, the challenges were originally setup to display only the scores of the challenges and they all wanted to know what they got right and wrong.

What will change next time. The challenge points will be changed from a team score to individual score, with the opportunity to earn badges along the way for them. A desired team score is still needed so the courses designed will be evaluated using a modified version of blackboard’s quality course rubric. The rubric score will give each team a score. Also, the idea of random points from the challenge is being removed.

Teaching the LMS through a Game (Part 3)

So this is what I came up with. I designed a blended course where instructors would work together to build a course as a team. It is a three-week course that covers the aspects of course design. The first week is course organization, navigation and content creation. Week two looks at assessment. Then the final week is spent on communication and collaboration. Participants were giving the role of an instructional designer on a team building a fictional course. They were provided information about course durations, student demographics and course learning objectives.

Each week the team was provided a list of objectives to complete on the course. Week one was to design a course navigation structure and course outline for content, then to begin collecting or creating content within the course structure. To help with the tasks at hand the instructors were provided tips and suggestions, both pedagogical and technical in nature. Every instructor had the opportunity to receive additional tips and suggestions by completing knowledge challenges on the features and functions of the LMS. Challenges were designed in three levels of difficulty, with more difficulty challenges earning more points and thus opening more tips and hints. There was also an opportunity to randomly earn bonus points by taking the challenges. Each instructor would work independently with the planning part of the task then the group would come together and finalize their plan and actually build that part of the course in the LMS.

There were some decisions I made based my research into game theory and my previous experiences. Fist the course material would not be on a subject the instructors were familiar with. The idea was to get them away from their preconceived notions of how to teach that subject and be open to looking at other parts of the LMS. The course topic was basket weaving. Second, challenge points earned by team members would be combined to create a team total, in an attempt to foster competition. Along these lines, instructors were able to take the challenges at any level as often and as many times as they would like to better their score.

Teaching the LMS through a Game (Part 2)

I looked at obstacles I have faced in my current training. Faculty were resistant to looking at new features, saying that would not work in my discipline or what I have works well enough. I also had faculty continue to struggle with finding support resources. It also felt from a support role faculty were getting the how to steps of the LMS, but not the why they should do something. Also from the feedback I got from students many faculty were missing key best practices and pedagogical principles of the online tools they were working with.

So I dug into game theory and found some tips that I found very helpful. The first was the idea of a role. If I could get the faculty to step outside the role of instructor and have them look at the course design process as an instructional designer they might just see the course and learning objectives in a new way. They would not be limited by their current set of LMS tools. I also though the idea of designing for someone else would help them get past those barriers. Other things I know I needed to address was the idea of levels of experience the ability to allow for mastery, an element of chance or randomness, a level of interactivity, the ability to earn rewards and to provide realistic feedback that is instructional. I know if people fail, they want to know why.

A School Day That’s All About Play

Imagine a school where the students’ day revolves around playing games, all day long. Video games, live action role-playing games, board games, building games. At the PlayMaker School in Los Angeles, the school day takes kids from one game activity to the next, as they explore any number of different subjects and ideas, from the physics of flight to ancient Mesopotamian culture. PBS NewsHour’s April Brown gives us a glimpse into this otherworldly school.

Read it here