Tag Archives: current education culture

Do you dare to dream?

Published on 27 Nov 2012

http://www.inknowation.com/es/
Since our childhood we all know how to dream. Asleep and awake. Thanks to the power of our imagination we believe we are capable of achieving anything we can dream of. However, as we grow older we lose this wonderful ability we’ll later need to be creative, to innovate, to change our lives and to transform our organizations. We invite you to dare to dream again, to challenge your comfort zone, and to enjoy the pleasure of turning your dreams into reality.
Do you dare to dream?

Computer Science Education Week Dec. 7-13, 2015

Launched in 2013, Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented students of color. Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science. We believe computer science should be part of core curriculum, alongside other courses such as biology, chemistry or algebra.

Code.org increases diversity in computer science by reaching students of all backgrounds where they are — at their skill-level, in their schools, and in ways that inspire them to keep learning.

Try an Hour of Code.

https://csedweek.org/

Try an Hour of Code™ with Khan Academy

https://code.org/

 

How to Build a Culture of Innovation: Sir Ken Robinson

Published on Feb 18, 2015

To learn more about enterprise transformation visit: http://www.simpleatwork.com

Internationally acclaimed expert on creativity and innovation Sir Ken Robinson teaches a packed audience at simple@work 2015. Sir Ken teaches us how to build a culture of innovation inside of our organizations.

The most-watched and discussed speaker in the history of the prestigious TED Conference, Sir Ken Robinson pushes people to rethink outdated assumptions about intelligence and creativity—and to unleash the real potential of people and organization.

Chat with Sir Ken Robinson at @SirKenRobinson on Twitter, or join the conversation at #simpleatwork.

Anonymous Messaging Apps on Campus

I read across this articular and it got me thinking. If I am up in front of a class lecturing, do I really want to know what my students are thinking?

Audrey Watterson 03 May 2015

This article first appeared on Educating Modern Learners in February 2015

Once again, students’ technology usage is prompting panic. This time, the scare involves anonymous messaging apps.

This past week alone, the following headlines crossed my desk: “Do your kids Yik Yak? Time for a chat.” “The Folly of Banning Yik Yak on School Campuses.” “A New Faculty Challenge: Fending Off Abuse on Yik Yak.” “Investigating the Yik Yak Attack.” “If Yik Yak is the problem, education is the answer, say local school boards.” “Student Government Poses Yik Yak Resolution.”

A Yik Yak Attack

Yik Yak is just one of several anonymous messaging apps (available for free on iOS and Android). Founded in 2013 by two college students (Tyler Droll and Brooks Buffington. Seriously), Yik Yak is made for and marketed specifically to university students. Yik Yak allows users to anonymously read and write “Yaks” within a ten mile radius. Because of that geographical limitation, Yik Yak purports to be more a more local and “intimate” messaging board.

Read here

AREN’T YOU SICK OF THOSE HIGHLY-PAID, EXPENSIVE TEACHERS?!?

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year!It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do — babysit!

We can get that for less than minimum wage.

That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and planning — that equals 6-1/2 hours).

So each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day…maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations!!

SO, LET’S SEE….

That’s $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on, I think my calculator must need new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6-1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute — there’s something wrong here, let me run those numbers again. Wow.

The average teacher’s salary (nationwide) is $50,000.

$50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours =

$1.42 per hour per student — a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE your kids.

WHAT A DEAL!!!!

And what about those expensive Teacher’s Pensions?
Turns out, tax payers aren’t even supposed to pay those. The teachers agreed to let the administrators withhold a percentage of their current wages, place those wages into growth & interest paying pension account so the teachers could then withdraw back their own wages (plus growth and interest), in their retirement years.

The fact that somebody in administration siphoned off some of that money (the teachers didn’t– they aren’t allowed to) has caused many of those pension funds to run low and therefore (by law) the administrators are now turning to the taxpayers to replenish the funds they borrowed from the teachers’ pension fund. Now, that’s a problem, but it’s not the teachers that caused the problem.

Make a teacher smile; repost this to show appreciation for all educators.

And, if you can read this and do the math, thank a teacher.

Courtesy of: http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/rnr/4975713967.html

How to escape education’s death valley

Sir Ken Robinson outlines 3 principles crucial for the human mind to flourish — and how current education culture works against them. In a funny, stirring talk he tells us how to get out of the educational “death valley” we now face, and how to nurture our youngest generations with a climate of possibility.