Tag Archives: education reform

Seema Bansal: How to fix a broken education system … without any more money

Seema Bansal forged a path to public education reform for 15,000 schools in Haryana, India, by setting an ambitious goal: by 2020, 80 percent of children should have grade-level knowledge. She’s looking to meet this goal by seeking reforms that will work in every school without additional resources. Bansal and her team have found success using creative, straightforward techniques such as communicating with teachers using SMS group chats, and they have already measurably improved learning and engagement in Haryana’s schools.

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Tim Harford: How messy problems can inspire creativity

Computer Science Education Week Dec. 7-13, 2015

Launched in 2013, Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented students of color. Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science. We believe computer science should be part of core curriculum, alongside other courses such as biology, chemistry or algebra.

Code.org increases diversity in computer science by reaching students of all backgrounds where they are — at their skill-level, in their schools, and in ways that inspire them to keep learning.

Try an Hour of Code.

https://csedweek.org/

Try an Hour of Code™ with Khan Academy

https://code.org/

 

Ken Robinson on Creativity at University

Published on Jul 21, 2015

Internationally influential thinker on education and creativity, Sir Ken Robinson considers how higher education institutions might play a greater role in developing the creative capacities of their students. His RSA Animate ‘Changing Educational Paradigms’ galvanised thinking about the role that creativity plays in schools: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFc…

RSA Spotlights – taking you straight to the heart of the event, highlighting our favourite moments and key talking points.

In this excerpt from the event ‘What’s the Point of Creativity at University’, Sir Ken Robinson discusses the global imperative for creativity and creative thinking.

The Importance Of Student Control Of Learning, Especially For Working Adults

Posted on July 7, 2015 by

When giving keynotes at conferences over the past two years, I have observed that some of the best non-verbal feedback occurs when pointing out that personalized and adaptive learning does not equal black-box algorithms choosing content for students. Yes, there are plenty of approaches pitching that solution (Knewton in its early state being the best-known if not most-current example), but there are other approaches designed to give faculty or instructional designers control over learning paths or even to give students control. There seems to be a sense of relief, particularly from faculty members, when discussing the latter approach.

Read it all here

How to think, not what to think | Jesse Richardson | TEDxBrisbane

Published on 17 Oct 2014

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Jesse is the founder of https://www.schoolofthought.org an online fully immersive learning environment that will be free for students, teachers and universities all over the world. He believes the key to engaging future generations is to teach them how, and not what, to think.

Jesse Richardson is a creative director with over 15 years industry experience, and around 20 years experience arguing with people on the internet. He’s responsible for three major international viral campaigns, two and a bit kids, and an ungrateful, overweight cat.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

AREN’T YOU SICK OF THOSE HIGHLY-PAID, EXPENSIVE TEACHERS?!?

Teachers’ hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year!It’s time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do — babysit!

We can get that for less than minimum wage.

That’s right. Let’s give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and planning — that equals 6-1/2 hours).

So each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to babysit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day…maybe 30? So that’s $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations!!

SO, LET’S SEE….

That’s $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on, I think my calculator must need new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master’s degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6-1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute — there’s something wrong here, let me run those numbers again. Wow.

The average teacher’s salary (nationwide) is $50,000.

$50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours =

$1.42 per hour per student — a very inexpensive babysitter and they even EDUCATE your kids.

WHAT A DEAL!!!!

And what about those expensive Teacher’s Pensions?
Turns out, tax payers aren’t even supposed to pay those. The teachers agreed to let the administrators withhold a percentage of their current wages, place those wages into growth & interest paying pension account so the teachers could then withdraw back their own wages (plus growth and interest), in their retirement years.

The fact that somebody in administration siphoned off some of that money (the teachers didn’t– they aren’t allowed to) has caused many of those pension funds to run low and therefore (by law) the administrators are now turning to the taxpayers to replenish the funds they borrowed from the teachers’ pension fund. Now, that’s a problem, but it’s not the teachers that caused the problem.

Make a teacher smile; repost this to show appreciation for all educators.

And, if you can read this and do the math, thank a teacher.

Courtesy of: http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/rnr/4975713967.html