Tag Archives: teaching

Five Ways to Incorporate Video Into Your Classroom and Instruction

By Patricia Brown (Columnist) Mar 22, 2016

Video in the classroom is powerful, because it has the ability to make the classroom come alive, and make meaningful learning experiences and connections. Video allows you to deliver long-lasting images, and reach children with various learning styles. But how do you make sure you’re keeping things fresh?

Here are a few ways you can incorporate video projects in your classroom—on a daily basis.

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Idea to retire: Technology alone can improve student learning

Ellen Lettvin, Joseph South and Katrina Stevens/Mar 18, 2016

Nearly every aspect of the world is being transformed by digital tools.  Over Thanksgiving weekend in 2015, more people shopped online than braved the aisles of brick and mortar stores fighting for highly discounted items. Globally, there are 2.6 billion active smartphone subscriptions. And self-driving cars have already clocked over 1 million miles on public roads.  There is no doubt that technology is impacting how we educate our children and ourselves as well.  Over 21 million post-secondary students are enrolled in online courses. Computers are in virtually every school in the country and more of those computers are connected to the Internet than ever before.  In fact, the number of students with broadband at school increased by 20 million over just the last two years. Because technology is widely perceived to improve our day-to-day experiences, it is logical to conclude that technology will improve learning outcomes in our nation’s schools by itself.  This is an idea that must die.

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Linda Liukas: A delightful way to teach kids about computers

https://embed-ssl.ted.com/talks/linda_liukas_a_delightful_way_to_teach_kids_about_computers.html

Computer code is the next universal language, and its syntax will be limited only by the imaginations of the next generation of programmers. Linda Liukas is helping to educate problem-solving kids, encouraging them to see computers not as mechanical, boring and complicated but as colorful, expressive machines meant to be tinkered with. In this talk, she invites us to imagine a world where the Ada Lovelaces of tomorrow grow up to be optimistic and brave about technology and use it to create a new world that is wonderful, whimsical and a tiny bit weird.

Start with why — how great leaders inspire action | Simon Sinek | TEDxPugetSound

Computer Science Education Week Dec. 7-13, 2015

Launched in 2013, Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented students of color. Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science. We believe computer science should be part of core curriculum, alongside other courses such as biology, chemistry or algebra.

Code.org increases diversity in computer science by reaching students of all backgrounds where they are — at their skill-level, in their schools, and in ways that inspire them to keep learning.

Try an Hour of Code.

https://csedweek.org/

Try an Hour of Code™ with Khan Academy

https://code.org/

 

3 Personalization Myths

Paul France , Teacher | Writer | Learner

A School Day That’s All About Play

Imagine a school where the students’ day revolves around playing games, all day long. Video games, live action role-playing games, board games, building games. At the PlayMaker School in Los Angeles, the school day takes kids from one game activity to the next, as they explore any number of different subjects and ideas, from the physics of flight to ancient Mesopotamian culture. PBS NewsHour’s April Brown gives us a glimpse into this otherworldly school.

Read it here

How to fix a broken school? Lead fearlessly, love hard

Anonymous Messaging Apps on Campus

I read across this articular and it got me thinking. If I am up in front of a class lecturing, do I really want to know what my students are thinking?

Audrey Watterson 03 May 2015

This article first appeared on Educating Modern Learners in February 2015

Once again, students’ technology usage is prompting panic. This time, the scare involves anonymous messaging apps.

This past week alone, the following headlines crossed my desk: “Do your kids Yik Yak? Time for a chat.” “The Folly of Banning Yik Yak on School Campuses.” “A New Faculty Challenge: Fending Off Abuse on Yik Yak.” “Investigating the Yik Yak Attack.” “If Yik Yak is the problem, education is the answer, say local school boards.” “Student Government Poses Yik Yak Resolution.”

A Yik Yak Attack

Yik Yak is just one of several anonymous messaging apps (available for free on iOS and Android). Founded in 2013 by two college students (Tyler Droll and Brooks Buffington. Seriously), Yik Yak is made for and marketed specifically to university students. Yik Yak allows users to anonymously read and write “Yaks” within a ten mile radius. Because of that geographical limitation, Yik Yak purports to be more a more local and “intimate” messaging board.

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Bloom’s Taxonomy feat Harry Potter